Hunkering Down? Get Creative. Start Writing…

Hunkering down at home due to COVID-19 (coronavirus)? Now might be the perfect time to start that story you’ve always wanted to tell. Michele Gierck, a specialist memoir writer and professional biographer can work with you, via Skype or phone, to write, or help you write, your story. For those of you who are not sure where to begin, YOU MIGHT ONLY NEED A COUPLE OF SESSIONS WITH MICHELE TO KICK-START YOUR CREATIVITY.

If you’d like to discuss your writing project with Michele, please get in touch with her via the contact page on her website.

Although based in Australia, Michele has been working with people in the USA and Europe for a number of years.
You can check out her author profile at, Amazon or on her website.

Recent praise for Michele’s writing, or help writing, memoirs:

‘Michele genuinely loves what she does. This is evident not only by the finished product but the way she goes above and beyond throughout the process of writing a book. I highly recommend Michele.’ (Tracey Hughes – Biography/Family History)
“I decided to put pen to paper and write my migrant journey. I am indebted to Michele Gierck for her guidance, incredible insight and structural ability so that my story flowed, resulting in the completion of a magnificent outcome, both as a literary achievement and quality of finished book. I can confidently recommend Michele as a true professional.’
Sam Tarascio, Founder and Executive Chairman of Salta Properties, one of Australia’s Top 50 privately-owned companies.

Image copyright Michele Gierck (Michele speaking at a literary event)

We All Have Our Stories

We All Have Our Stories

Sunset Lake Eyre July 2010

We all have our stories. But so often our stories are not heard. And if not written down, at least in Western culture, they are often forgotten.

I was reminded of this during an early morning visit to the local pool. (I’ve been swimming at the same pool for nine years.) Today, instead of laps I was walking up and down in the aqua play area, and so was a retired fellow called Joe. We always say hello to each other, but this morning, since we were walking at the same pace, we started chatting. And before I knew it, I was listening to an amazing story.

In ten minutes I learnt that Joe was from Italy and had migrated to Australia as a 24 or 25 year old. Married to a woman from his own village, and determined to support his family and have a life, once in Australia, Joe worked in the textile industry — 7 days a week! And he worked hard.

Truth be known, Joe had always worked hard. His parents died when he was seven years old, and his 16-year-old sister — who had one leg amputated — had brought up Joe and his younger brother. By nine years of age, Joe was accustomed to walking 35 kilometres to the nearest town to sell goods, and then 35 kilometres back home. All in the one day! And I can just imagine the condition of his shoes.

By nine years of age, Joe had become the man of the house.

Now a grandfather, when I suggested that Joe write his story, so his kids and grandkids could understand the sheer guts and determination that is part of their family roots, and their DNA, he confided that he’d learnt to read, but not to write.

And that got me thinking. (I can’t help it. I am a memoir writer, having written two of my own memoirs, and quite a number for other people. I’m always thinking about life stories.) What would be the best way for someone who is not able to write in their second language to record their story? It’s an important question because Joe is one of the many many people whose story is so worthy of being on the public record — not just for the public, but for his own family, and for generations to come.

Image and text © Michele Gierck