Take your time to really listen to others

‘Take your time to really hear others'< was a an article which appeared in Australian newspapers and led to media interviews. The article was based on interviews in Australia and the US.

It seemed to hit home with quite a few people.

If you have any memorable or interesting stories or experiences about listening that you’d like to share, feel free to send them to Michele via the contact page on her website.

Enjoy

Michele Gierck

We All Have Our Stories

We All Have Our Stories

Sunset Lake Eyre July 2010

We all have our stories. But so often our stories are not heard. And if not written down, at least in Western culture, they are often forgotten.

I was reminded of this during an early morning visit to the local pool. (I’ve been swimming at the same pool for nine years.) Today, instead of laps I was walking up and down in the aqua play area, and so was a retired fellow called Harry. We always say hello to each other, but this morning, since we were walking at the same pace, we started chatting. And before I knew it, I was listening to an amazing story.

In ten minutes I learnt that Harry was from Greece and had migrated to Australia as a 24 or 25 year old. Married to a woman from his own village, and determined to support his family and have a life, once in Australia, Harry worked in the textile industry — 7 days a week! And he worked hard.

Truth be known, Harry had always worked hard. His parents died when he was seven years old, and his 16-year-old sister — who had one leg amputated — had brought up Harry and his younger brother. By nine years of age, Harry was accustomed to walking 35 kilometres to the nearest town to sell goods, and then 35 kilometres back home. All in the one day! And I can just imagine the condition of his shoes.

By nine years of age, Harry had become the man of the house.

Now a grandfather, when I suggested that Harry write his story, so his kids and grandkids could understand the sheer guts and determination that is part of their family roots, and their DNA, he confided that he’d learnt to read, but not to write.

And that got me thinking. What would be the best way for someone who is not able to write in their second language to record their story? It’s an important question because Harry is one of the many many people whose story is so worthy of being on the public record — not just for the public, but for his own family, and for generations to come.

Finding Your Special Spot

Finding Your Special Spot

Stream Maroondah Catchment

How good it is to find your special spot. A place to relax, to calm, to be. A place to listen, to be drawn into the moment. (No phones, ipads or laptops here!)

There’s been quite a bit of media and a number of talks given since the release of my latest book, Fraying: Mum, memory loss, the medical maze and me, in March. Now, it’s time to get back to basics, create a calm space … and write.

Yes, all the talks and interviews are enjoyable, but at heart the joy of writing is one that for me cannot be quelled. If I don’t write, I feel a part of myself is missing.

For those interested, I will be back speaking again in September, during Dementia Awareness Month. More details soon.

Storytelling and Surprises

Storytelling and Surprises

JohnReflectingAn old friend, a respected Australia journalist and storyteller, once told me that when it comes to writing people’s stories, put away your preconceived ideas and biases, and simply meet them as a person. Listen without judgement. Be really present. And you might be surprised. How insightful.

Tune in

Tune in

BirdBillHoneyeaterI was speaking at a conference this week. My topic was storytelling. There’s nothing more precious than our stories, except of course a healthy memory to file them in. There are so many different stories all around us, if we tune in–and listen.